Saturday, December 11, 2010

Brandy Egg Nogg

During the holidays, if you don't plan on having large parties with several guests but rather enjoy small intimate gatherings that don't require a lot of food or large bowls of holiday punches why not try the brandy egg nogg. The recipe calls for one serving but you can alway make a few at a time for your guests and they'll love it.

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com


Brandy Egg Nogg

1 egg
2 tsp powdered sugar
2 oz brandy
6 oz of milk
Nutmeg

Place ingredients except the nutmeg in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously for about 20 - 30 seconds and pour into a Collins glass garnish with grated nutmeg.

Thursday, December 9, 2010

Christmas Bowl of Bishop

In the Charles Dickens Novel A Christmas Carol, Ebinezer Scrooge had spent the night with three ghosts and finally comes to repentence of his ways. On Christmas day he visits his nephew and dips the laddle in the bowl of Bishops punch to enjoy.
Punches were very popular in the nineteenth century and are a communal drink not to be mesured per cup but to have a generous amount for all guests. This Christmas show your generosity and serve up a bowl of Bishop for all your guests.

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com


Christmas Bowl of Bishop

2 lemons
1/2 pint of water
Whole mulling spices
1 bottle ruby port
1/4 cup sugar, more or less to taste.

Stude two lemons with half a dozen cloves each. Roast the lemons in the oven for half an hour more or less at 350 degrees.  Cut the roasted lemons in half and put them into a saucepan with a half pint of water and whole mulling spices, such as cinnamon, allspice, ginger, mace, and star anise.  Don't use powdered spices which will make the drink sludgy.  Boil off a little of the water before adding the port, and then sugar to taste. Be sure not to boil the wine, but let it steep just below a simmer for an hour.  If the punch is too strong, add a little more water.  Serve steaming in punch cups or mugs.

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

It's Wassail Time

If you're not familiar with Wassail, it refers to ancient southern English tradition, of people wassailing or hopes that the apple trees would yield a good crop of apples for cider.

It's also a hot mulled punch often associated with yuletide season and is traditionally made with mulled cider, Cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg along with wine, port or other spirits. When made, it's great to have it sit on the stove with a low flame, it creates a wonderful aroma that makes the whole house smell wonderful and it's also great to pour into a mug for your guest at Christmas.

God bless and Cheers,


John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com


Wassail


12 Eggs
4 Bottles of Sherry or Madeira
2 pounds of Sugar
1 tsp powdered Nutmeg
2 tsp of Ginger
6 Whole Coves
1/2 tsp of Mace
6 whole Allspice
1 tsp Cinnamon

Mix the the dry ingredients in 1/2 pint of water.  Add the wine and let the mixture simmer over a very low flame.  Beat the egg yolks and whites separately and add these to the hot brew.  Before serving, add several baked apples and lace the mixture well with brandy.  Makes approximately 25 - 30 cups.

Monday, December 6, 2010

Time for Bishops Cooler

Tis the season to get beyond the traditional carton of eggnog one purchases at his local grocery store and pour some whiskey and brandy into it and serve it up for expectant guests for a Christmas or Hanukkah party.  The host may wonder why there's so much left over at end of the night.

Why not go a step further and go back to old traditional drink that was served up in the nineteenth and first half of the twentieth centuries called the Bishops Cooler. It's the protestant bishop mentioned in barman Jerry Thomas's 1862 Bartenders guide also in "Trader Vic" Bergeron's 1947 bar book along with two other recipes but this one is of the best and easy to make.

God bless and cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com


Bishop's Cooler


Juice of 1/2 lemon (approx 1/2 oz)
Juice of half an orange (approx 1 oz)
1 tsp sugar
3 oz of Burgundy (wine)
1/2 oz of Jamaican rum (Appleton Estates)

Squeeze lemon and orange juice over cracked ice in a 10 oz glass, add sugar and stir.  Add burgundy and stir, float the rum.    

Sunday, December 5, 2010

National Repeal Day

Hello Friends and family,

December 5 is special day to commemorate the repeal of the eighteenth amendment or if you're not familiar, the abolishment of prohibition. It was thought of as a good idea by the woman's Christian Temperance movement during the early party of the 20th century that alcohol was the cause of many social ills. One of the most famous was Carrie Nation who would go into bars with a hatchet in hand and start destroying the bar and get arrested for publicity. 

The the Volstead act ( eighteenth amendment ) was in tact from 1919 until  December 5th 1933. The law prohibited the production, sale and transport of intoxicating liquors but didn't define "intoxicating liquors" or provide penalties.  America's thirst for Alcohol increased along with organized crime and the growth of many speakeasies. This proved to be a failed attempt at trying to govern the moral fiber of the nation.

This is not a widely celebrated event but it commemorates Americans right to drink as they please. So Celebrate today by stopping by your favorite tavern, winery, pub or bring home your favorite spirit and raise a glass in honor of it and enjoy. For more information check out www.repealday.org or the Ken Burns documentary Prohibition .

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com 

Thursday, November 25, 2010

TOM AND JERRY is not just a cartoon!

At one time was as much a part of American holiday celebrations as mistletoe and roasting chestnuts. In 1880’s Manhattan fashionable bars would place an ornate punchbowl in the middle of the bar containing the Tom and Jerry “batter”. The Brass Rail bar in Port Huron, Michigan, has kept the Tom and Jerry tradition alive since it’s opening in 1937.  They start serving it the week before Thanksgiving and continue until New Year’s Eve.

The drink derives its name from the two rambunctious protagonists of the hugely popular English novel  
“Life in London” (1821), and not from Jerry Thomas, as he would have everyone believe.  The book inspired a number items named after the characters, but mostly Tom and Jerry was used to describe things drink related.  This a delicious hot drink that deserves to be served not only during winter holidays, but throughout the entire fall and winter seasons.

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca

john@daddyosmartinis.com 


½ cup batter (see below)
1oz brandy
1oz rum
Hot water

Ladle batter into a heated mug.  Pour in liquor and then fill with boiling hot water.  Top with grated nutmeg.  Let cool enough to be drinkable, and serve with a spoon for stirring. Tom and Jerry Batter (serves 8)

4 eggs, separated
Cream of Tartar
¾ cup powdered sugar

Whip egg whites with a sprinkle of cream of tartar until they are stiff.  Fold in ¾ cup powdered sugar and the egg yolks.  Mix until the batter is light and frothy.

Gingerbread Manhattan

Something I'm thankful for is the discovery of the Gingerbread Manhattan. It was an idea of Matt Parkinson of Viand restaurant in Chicago because the establishment was using gingerbread syrup for some of it's coffee drinks. Matt decided try switching out the sweet vermouth for the syrup and low and behold, the drink was born. It's great to have this as one of you're holiday drinks and it's really easy to make.

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com

Gingerbread Manhattan 


3 oz of Bourbon ( Buffalo Trace)
1/2 oz of gingerbread syrup ( Torani brand )
1 dash of Angostura bitters
Marasca cherry from Italy (Luxardo)
Crystallized ginger

Combine bourbon, gingerbread syrup and angostura bitters in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously for 30 seconds and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a Marasca Cherry and crystallized ginger on a toothpick. 

Thursday, November 18, 2010

The Truth about bitters

Bitters Make Better

Fri, Nov 12, 2010
Photo by Jeff Harris

Enliven almost any cocktail with a modern twist on an ancient recipe.

by Wayne Curtis
Bitters are back, and it’s about time. Originally used as a stomach tonic, bitters made the leap to recreational beverages a couple of centuries ago when tipplers realized that just a few drops made a merely potable liquor far more interesting. Then came Prohibition, and bitters all but disappeared.
With the advent of the cocktail revival, though, small-batch producers started ginning up an array of bitters. (They’re made by infusing sharp-tasting roots and barks, along with spices, citrus peels, and other exotica, in alcohol.) Doubt their effectiveness? Mix up two Manhattans; add bitters to one, taste, and you’ll never go back. Below are the best examples we’ve found — but first, a few drinks that allow this elixir to shine.
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THE ANGOSTURA SOUR
Kirk Estopinal of Cure in New Orleans pops off the shaker top on his bottle of Angostura for this surprisingly refreshing bitters-based concoction.
1-1/2 oz Angostura bitters
3/4 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz simple syrup
1 egg white
Shake in cocktail shaker (without ice) until frothy, then add ice and shake until well chilled. Strain into cocktail glass. Serve up.
THE WALDORF
Cocktail guru Jonathan Pogash pours this vintage drink for the Empire Room at New York’s Empire State Building.
1 tsp absinthe
1-1/4 oz rye whiskey
1-1/4 oz sweet vermouth
Dash of Boker’s Bitters
Dash of Fee Brothers Whiskey Barrel-Aged Bitters
Rinse glass with teaspoon of absinthe. Stir remaining ingredients with cracked ice in a stirring glass, then strain into absinthe-rinsed glass. Garnish with long lemon peel.
THE LOOP TONIC
Celery bitters and tequila know how to work together, as Phil Ward of Mayahuel in New York proves in this complex cocktail.
2 oz white tequila
1 oz dry vermouth
3/4 oz freshly squeezed
lime juice
1/2 oz simple syrup
1/2 oz green Chartreuse
Dash of celery bitters
Shake and strain into a highball glass filled with ice. Garnish with a celery stick.
—-
Photo by Michael Pirrocco

-
Best Bitters: The Short List

From blueberry to the classic dried orange peel, there’s a flavor for everyone.
Sweetgrass Bitter Blueberry
Made from blueberry wine, these bitters are intense yet round and supple. Use for a more tart taste ($8;sweetgrasswinery.com).
Fee Brothers Whiskey Barrel-Aged Bitters
Fee’s richly aromatic bitters are aged in used bourbon casks. Perfect for an old-fashioned ($15; feebrothers.com).
-
-

The Bitter Truth Celery Bitters

Of any celery-based bitters, these have the biggest flavor. Try in place of celery salt in a Bloody Mary ($16; the-bitter-truth.com).
Boker’s Bitters
These cardamom-based bitters appeared in 1828 but vanished with Prohibition. In 2009 an entrepreneur reverse-engineered them to bring them back ($20; bokersbitters.co.uk).
Angostura Orange Bitters
A few drops of orange bitters can make a shy drink stand up and croon. This makes for a fine Angostura sour (see above) ($11; angostura.com).
-
Watch video of Jonathan Pogash concocting three tasty cocktails using bitters atmensjournal.com/bitters.
This article originally appeared in the November 2010 issue of Men’s Journal.
Follow us on Twitter: @MensJournal @MJGearGuy
and on Facebook

Friday, October 29, 2010

Chimayó Cocktail

Being that my family origin is from New Mexico, I enjoy the food and flavors from the southwest. As far as cocktails go, I haven't heard of too many that are native of that region until I recently came across the Chimayó Cocktail that was invented at the Rancho de Chimayó restaurant in Chimayó New Mexico in 1965. The owner of this establishment Arturo Jaramillo was looking for use of his apples that are plentiful in the area and after experimenting came up with this cocktail which is the restaurants signature drink.

God bless and cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com


The Chimayó Cocktail


1 1/2 oz tequila ( I prefer Milagro Blanco)
1 oz unfiltered apple cider
1/4 oz fresh squeezed lemon juice
1/4 oz Crème de cassis


Combine all ingredients in a highball glass with ice, stir and garnish with a slice of unpeeled apple.



Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Hot Buttered Rum - A classic with a spicy finish!

One of many hot drinks during fall and winter I enjoy is the hot buttered rum. It contains several flavors I like such as of dark rum with the molasses finish, butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg and vanilla. Combine all of these with some boiling water and you get a tasty treat with a spicy finish for you mouth and warms you all over. Give it a try on these colder nights while sitting next to the fire place.

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com

Hot Buttered Rum


1 1/3 oz dark Rum ( such as Myers)
1 small slice of butter
1 teaspoon brown sugar
cinnamon
nutmeg
Vanilla
boiling water

Mix the the butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg and vanilla essence in the glass until it's creamy.  Pour in the rum and the boiling water over a teaspoon and mix well.

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Blue Blazer

Last week I had a cold and even lost my voice at one point while working a bartending gig for Surfrider Foundation ( Long Beach Chapter). When I got home, my friend Mark new what to give me to help coat my throat and to make me feel better, it was the blue blazer and after having one of those, it not only helped me but put me to sleep as well. I recommend this hot drink as a remedy for whatever type of cold ails you this fall and winter, you can't go wrong with it!

It was invented by legendary "Professor" Jerry Thomas while he was in residence at the bar of the El Dorado, San Francisco in the nineteenth century. With this drink he perfected the technique of igniting the whiskey and throwing the flaming liquid between tow silver tankards - mixing he ingredients whilst the bar was aflame. This act was preformed before President Grant so much that he presented him with a cigar!

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com


Blue Blazer 

1  3/4 oz whiskey
1 3/4 oz boiling water
1 bar spoon of honey
juice of half a lemon

Heat the whiskey in a small saucepan and pour into one tankard, Put the boiling water into the other tankard. Light the whiskey and while it's flaming, pour the two liquids from one tankard to the other for or five times.. This may seem difficult at first and practice is required before you preform this act in front of guests.

Monday, October 25, 2010

Cinnamon Warmer

Tis the season for fire places to be lit, the air to be brisk in the morning and for a soothing drink to make us feel warm all over. The vitamins in this drink will invigorate your bloodstream to face the elements outside in the cold.  This is also a great drink to have sit on you're stove top on a low flame to make the whole house smell of cinnamon, ginger and all the other ingredients.

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com


Cinnamon Warmer


1 1/4 oz Calvados ( Apple Brandy)
1/2 oz dark rum
3 1/2 oz clear apple juice
Juice of half a lemon
3 slices of fresh ginger
1 teaspoon of clear honey
3 cloves
1 small cinnamon stick

Pour all of the liquid, including the honey into a saucepan and heat slowly. Do not boil.  Place the spices in a muslin cloth, tie the top in a knot and place in the saucepan.  (This provides the flavor and avoids having to scoop the bits out when the drink is ready) Float a few twists of lemon and orange peel in the mixture.  This will give a slight citrus taste.  Strain in the glass and enjoy.

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Lion's Tail

Some of my favorite things about October is the relaxing scents that accompany the season such at cinnamon, pine cone, allspice, etc. One of the cocktails that includes some of these aromas is the Lion's Tail. It's from the Cafe Royal Cookbook from published in London in 1937 and since the term twisting the Lion's tail was American slang it must have been an American refugee that went to the UK during prohibition and stayed.

I've made this cocktail for several friends and they love it because of the flavors it carries. Give it a try at you're fall celebrations.

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com

Lion's Tail 

2 oz of bourbon whiskey
3/4 oz Allspice Dram
1/2 oz fresh lime juice
1/2 oz tablespoon simple syrup
2 dashes angostura bitters

Put all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously, strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Monday, October 18, 2010

Brandy Alexander

I recently taught a class on Vintage Cocktails along with a chef teaching appetizers at Culinary Enterprises in Signal Hill on last Friday night. One of the drinks that I featured was the Brandy Alexander. It's origin is from the Alexander Cocktail named after Czar Alexander II that's made with gin. This variation uses brandy was supposedly concocted for the wedding of Princess Mary and the Viscount Lascelles in London in 1922.  It became very popular during the Jazz age and is recently made a comeback. Try this recipe and you'll think you're drinking chocolate, you wont be disappointed!

God bless and cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com

Brandy Alexander 


3/4 oz Brandy
3/4 oz Brown cream de cacao
3/4 oz Heavy cream
Ground nutmeg for garnish

Place all ingredients in a cocktails shaker with ice and shake vigorously and pour into a chilled cocktails glass, sprinkle ground nutmeg on top before serving. 

Monday, September 13, 2010

Moulin Rouge

Moulin Rouge is a film and romantic musical and based on the Orpheam myth and Giuseppe Verdi's opera, La Traviata. It tells the story of a young English poet / writer who falls in love with the star of Moulin Rouge cabaret actress and courtesan. It uses the musical setting of the Montmartre quarter of Paris France.

Because this film is so fun and won so many awards, I knew there had to be a drink by the same name. I did some research and found one in two books with varying ingredients but the I choose and know you'll enjoy.

Moulin Rouge


1/2 oz of Orange flavored gin
1/2 oz of Apricot brandy
3 dashes of Grenadine

Stir well with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.

Thursday, September 9, 2010

Obituary Cocktail

A pleasant way to put things to rest, start with an obituary cocktail. Made with one of my favorite ingredients ( Aviation gin ) dry vermouth and Absinthe. For those of you morning a loss of job, relationship or a loved one, this can't replace those things but can certainly help.

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com

Obituary Cocktail


2 oz Aviation gin
1/4 oz Martini and Rossi Extra dry vermouth
1/4 oz Marteau Absinthe

Combine all ingredients in a tumbler, stir well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon twist.

Wednesday, September 8, 2010

Green Jaguar

When I first heard of a Green Jaguar, the first thought that came to mind is the British imported car that has an impressive exterior body and interior but has a reputation of electrical problems. This little concoction is much better and will not disappoint you but instead take you on a new journey with the little green fairy aka Absinthe. This drink is also Tequila based but when mixed with absinthe along with the other ingredients it's an eye opener which will having you coming back for a second or third. Give it a try or have a bar with all the ingredients make one for you.

God bless & cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com

Green Jaguar 


1 1/2 oz Parton Silver Tequila or you're favorite
3/4 oz Grand Marnier
3/4 oz Amer Picon
3/4 oz Lucid Absinthe
1/4 oz fresh squeezed orange juice
1 splash of orange bitters

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

The Summer Rye

Summer is quickly slipping away but there's still time to indulge in some summertime cocktails and being a man who loves rye I found this gem of a drink I can enjoy while relaxing on the lounge chair soaking up some sun this Labor Day weekend. The summer rye is another drink with my new favorite liqueur St-Germain and when used in cocktails it adds so much to the flavor and gives drinks such great balance, like adding fresh herbs to a meal. Like the old commercial says, " try it, you'll like it." 

God bless & Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com 

The Summer Rye 

1/4 oz simple syrup
3/4 oz fresh squeezed lime juice
1 oz fresh pressed apple juice (cloudy)
3/4 oz champagne 

Shake all ingredients together except for the champagne in a cocktail shaker and strain into an ice filled Collins glass, top with champagne. Add cubed apples for garnish. 

Sangria Flora

For those that prefer more tamer drinks for their pallet  as opposed to harder alcohol, I recommend the Sangria Flora. It's very light and refreshing and includes fresh seasonal fruit that goes well in these hotter days of summer.  It's not hard to make and serves plenty of your guests at you're next afternoon affair or soirée.   

Sangria Flora


1 Bottle of Sauvignon Blanc or dry white wine
1 cup of St-Germain
2 fresh peaches
5 - 6 fresh strawberries
6 fresh raspberries
1 bunch fresh grapes

Stir all ingredients in a pitcher or carafe. Allow fruit to soak in the mixture between 3 - 8 hours.  Serve in an ice filled glass and tell you're friends they're having something healthy to drink.

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

The Summer Rye

Summer is quickly slipping away but there's still time to indulge in some summertime cocktails and being a man who loves rye I found this gem of a drink I can enjoy while relaxing on the lounge chair soaking up some sun. The summer rye is another drink with my new favorite liqueur St-Germain and when used in cocktails it adds so much to the flavor and gives drinks such great balance, like adding fresh herbs to a meal. Like the old commercial says, " try it, you'll like it." 

God bless & Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com 

The Summer Rye 

1 1/2 oz Sazerac Rye Whiskey
3/4 oz St-Germain 
1/4 oz simple syrup
3/4 oz fresh squeezed lime juice
1 oz fresh pressed apple juice (cloudy)
3/4 oz champagne 

Shake all ingredients together except for the champagne in a cocktail shaker and strain into an ice filled Collins glass, top with champagne. Add cubed apples for garnish. 



Monday, August 30, 2010

St-Rita

Not to long ago I was up in Santa Barbara for Spanish Days, that celebrates the Spanish heritage with a parade and several performances. My friend and I went for lunch at a favorite local spot Carlitos where they had a special lunch and drink menu for the occasion. One of the cocktails that was offered was a Margarita made with St-Germain and lime juice, it was so tasty and a new twist on the traditional drink, I had two of them. If you try them this weekend, I guarantee you'll want more like I did.

God bless and Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com

St-Rita 

1 1/2 oz of Tequila Blanco
3/4 oz St-Germain
3/4 oz fresh lime juice

Shake all ingredients together in a cocktail shaker with ice and serve either straight up in a cocktail glass or on the rocks.

Friday, August 27, 2010

The Enlightenment Cocktail

The Enlightenment Cocktail is either "the thinking man's drink or the poor mans champagne cocktail." I can't claim this drink as my own but I have drank it on several occasions and introduced it to my friends and they love it. This wonderful concoction was invented by Aidan Demarest formerly of the Edison now of First and Hope in downtown Los Angeles. Aidan uses Woodford Reserve Bourbon and light beer to top it off. This is a great drink while sitting down on the patio or balcony  enjoying a summer day.

God bless & Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com

The Enlightenment Cocktail

2 oz of Bourbon ( Woodford Reserve )
1/2 oz fresh lemon juice
1/2 oz pomegranate syrup
Light or light flavored beer

Pour ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice except the beer and shake vigorously for 20 - 30 seconds. Pour into a chilled cocktail glass and top off with beer.

Thursday, August 26, 2010

The French Gimlet

I just attended a Speakeasy night last Saturday night in Hollywood. Several distillers of various spirits where there with samples which is always enlightening to learn about new products. I met the representatives of St-Germain and can't talk about it enough. I actually found out about this liqueur some time ago but one of my favorite drinks that is mixed with it and puts a whole new twist on the cocktails is the French Gimlet. It's similar to a standard Gimlet but rather than adding Roses lime juice use St-Germain along with real lime juice for a bit of tartness which adds to the flavor. Once you try one of these, you'll never want to go back to a standard Gimlet. Try it and let me know how you like it.

God bless & Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com

The French Gimlet 


 2 oz of gin
1 1/2 oz St-Germain
1/2 oz of fresh lime juice

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously and serve in a chilled cocktail glass and add a lime wedge for garnish.

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

The St- Germain Cocktail

Whenever you're having your next dinner or cocktail party and am not sure what to serve, rather then opening up wine or beer, consider serving St-Germain cocktails. The drinks are light, refreshing, easy to make and tasty. If you're not sure what is St-Germain is, it's a liqueur made from elderflowers in the foothills of the Alps and when mixed with you're favorite gin, Champagne or other spirits, makes for a delicious concoction that you and you're guests will be talking about long after the party. I recommend the St-Germain Cocktail and I'll be posting more of these wonderful libations.

God bless & cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com

The St. Germain Cocktail


2 oz of Brute Champagne
1 1/2 oz of St-Germain
top off with club soda

Fill a Collins glass with ice, add the Champagne, then St-Germain the top off with club soda, still and garnish with a lime wedge.

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Watermelon Frappé

Summertime has finally hit southern California last week and there is a lot of celebrations still going on and parents are excited to know their children will be going back to school in a few weeks. While we continue this last hurrah before the start of fall, consider a watermelon Frappé that's cool, refreshing, not too many calories and can be enjoyed by both adults and kids alike. Watermelons are in abundance and are a sure quencher during the dog days of summer.

Cheers,

John Apodaca
john@daddyosmartinis.com 

Watermelon Frappé 
1 small watermelon
5 tablespoons of powdered sugar
2 cups of crushed ice

Place a quarter cup of crushed ice into a blender, add a quarter of the melon flesh and sugar and blend until smooth.  Pour the mixture into a pitcher and put to one side.  Repeat the process  three times to make up the right amount. Pour into ten tumblers and enjoy!